About thequiltedcat

Mom to a teenager, wife, quilter, hiker, cat wrangler, dog mom, lover of nature, and tech writer!

Making a Fabric Basket (or Tub)

Hi everyone!

Recently, I came across a fun sew along on Instagram where the participants were making fabric baskets, also called tubs. I was intrigued by them, by I knew that I didn’t have time to complete one within the sew along timeframe. I purchased the pattern called “Tub Family” from RosieTaylorCrafts on Etsy, and set it aside for a couple of days.

Then, several weekends ago, I had a few hours to try my hand at making one. The pattern comes with 3 sizes of fabric baskets, and I opted to make the largest one. I have some of the beautiful Homemade fabric by Tula Pink, which I think is absolutely perfect to make all sorts of things for my sewing room.

The pattern walks you through the construction steps pretty well, but I have a few pointers if you decide to make one.

Once you have your main basket panel, liner, and foam all ready for quilting, I do recommend using the straight-line quilting as mentioned in the pattern. I tried doing an all over swirly type quilting on my test basket, but I had a much harder time attaching the bottom and getting the basket to sit properly. It’s just kinda floppy!

On my “real” basket, I did straight-line quilting using a beautiful Aurifil bright green thread with a seam guide on my Bernina. In the picture below, you can see my seam guide helped to give me perfect 1-inch quilting lines.

After quilting at 1-inch and .5-inch intervals, I had my finished main panel, ready for my quilt inspector. I used some fun Tula Pink ribbon along either side of the fussy cut sewing machine in the center of the panel. This pattern is so flexible that you could make baskets out of scraps, a single piece of fabric, or several large chunks like I did.

My finished main body panel with quilt inspector

After trimming the main panel to the correct size, I started to attach the base to the body. This step is the hardest part of the whole pattern because the base really needs to be eased in using clips or pins.

I used Clover clips to secure my base rather than pins. No blood! If the base is still too large after easing it, you may need to trim it down slightly.

Using Clover clips to attach the base

The pattern does have you hand stitch the base to the body before using your sewing machine to help with puckers. I highly recommend doing this step. You can remove the clips after hand basting, and then use your machine to slowly and carefully stitch the base to the body.

I did my binding a bit different from the pattern by pressing one side in 1/4-inch so that I’d have a nice finished edge to work with when sewing the second long edge to the inside of the basket.

Getting the binding ready

I did completely machine stitch my binding rather than hand sewing the inside, just for lack of time. I used the same color thread as the quilting, and I think it looks fine.

Here’s a look at my completed fabric basket, filled with some EPP supplies:

My finished basket!

These baskets are addictive to make, and I want to try making the medium and small sized ones soon. Maybe Christmas themed ones as well!

There are many examples of completed baskets using the #tubfamily hashtag on Instagram.

Enjoy and happy sewing!

-Jen

Sea Glass BOM, Months 8 and 9

Hi everyone,

I’ve caught up with my Sea Glass block of the month program by Fig Tree & Co!

In September, we got the fabric pack and pattern for month 8, which instructed us to make 24 setting blocks instead of the regular 2 focus blocks that we usually make. At first, I thought that 24 blocks would take a long time, but the setting blocks come together very quickly with chain piecing.

We only used solid fabrics in these blocks, alternating the colors in small squares between a light aqua and a light green.

Month 8 setting blocks

For this month’s block, we returned to the standard format of 2 focus blocks. The block this month did not come with a name, as they usually do, so I’m sure that we just a small oversight. I really love the block this month, and how the blue color really pops!

Month 9 blocks

We have 3 more months to go left on this wonderful BOM. I have all the blocks up on my design wall in my sewing room, and I just love the soothing color palette. I can’t wait to see how it will all come together in the final month!

Take care and happy quilting!

Jen

How to Make a Trumpet Bell Cover

Recently, my son’s high school band received permission to begin in person outdoor rehearsals. They are limited to 10 students per rehearsal time, and they need to have a bell cover and wear a mask.

I decided to make bell covers for all the trumpets in his group so that they wouldn’t have to wait for an online order, which could take weeks. There are 7 trumpets in his cohort group, and each bell cover takes about 10 minutes to make.

7 trumpet bell covers!

Supplies Needed

  • Stretchy material (polyester/spandex blend). I purchased some athletic apparel fabric from my local fabric store in blue, which matches one of the school’s colors.
  • 3/8″ elastic
  • Safety pin
  • Thread to match
  • Paper and pencil for template
  • Sewing machine and basic sewing supplies

Instructions

  1. Trace the trumpet bell onto a piece of paper.
  2. Enlarge the bell shape by about 1.25 inches to create your pattern. I used a school compass for this step or you could eyeball it. I found that a 1″ enlargement was a bit too small to fit over the bell comfortably. If you use cotton fabric instead of the poly/spandex blend, you’ll likely want to cut it 1.5 inches larger.
  3. Cut (2) circles from the fabric.
  4. Place the circles right sides together (RST), pin or clip together, and stitch using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Be sure to leave a small area open for turning right sides out and backstitch at the start and end of your stitching.

    Sew a 1/4″ seam, leaving an opening for turning

    Opening in the bell cover before turning

  5. Turn right sides out.
  6. Stitch another seam about 5/8″ from the edge of the circle to create the casing for the elastic. Stitch around the entire circle and backstitch. You do not need an opening for this second seam.
  7. Cut a piece of elastic about 11.25 inches long.
  8. Place a safety pin on one of the short edges of the elastic to help you insert the elastic into the casing. Be sure to hang onto the other end so that it doesn’t get sucked into the casing.

    Inserting the elastic into the casing

  9. Overlap both ends of the elastic about 1/2″ and sew together securely. I removed the pin before stitching.

    Overlap the elastic about 1/2-inch and sew

  10. Sew the opening closed.

    Sew the opening

  11. Ease the elastic around the casing so that it is more or less evenly dispersed.

    Inside of trumpet bell cover

  12. Place the bell cover on your trumpet and play!

Trumpet standing with bell cover

Trumpet bell cover

My quilt inspector supervised me very closely during this process. Maybe he thought I was making him a shower cap? Ha, ha!

Is it a cat shower cap?

I hope to make my son a reusable face mask with a little slot or flap for the trumpet mouth piece next. Until then, the band members have to cut a little slot into disposable face masks in order to play. They are also social distancing during practice. 

It’s a strange new world in so many unexpected ways!

Take care and happy sewing!

Jen

Scrappy Summer Sew Along + Update on Pepper

Hi everyone,

I posted about joining a scrappy summer sew along a few weeks ago here. This quilt uses your scrap bin to make a 9-patch blocks for a scrappy finish!

I used a bunch of yellows plus pinks/reds to make a “Raspberry Lemonade” scrappy quilt. I started sewing my 9-patch blocks as leaders/enders while working on other projects. Then, a bunch of crazy life stuff happened, and I had to stop sewing for a couple of weeks.

Here’s a look at some of my 9-patch blocks, with sunlight filtering in through a side window:

Scrappy 9-patch blocks

Sunday was the last day to post our finished top on Instagram as part of the sew along. I pulled out the 9-patch blocks that I had completed, and I had just enough for a baby sized quilt. My quilt inspector helped me to sort the blocks into rows and columns.

Romeo inspects the
9-patch blocks

I enjoyed sewing these little blocks together as a sort of meditative time for myself. We had beautiful weather here yesterday so I was able to get a picture of the quilt flimsy, fluttering in the breeze, on a nearby little bridge.

Scrappy Summer Sew Along Flimsy – Raspberry Lemonade!

I’m going to back this little quilt with some soft, cuddly Minky fabric and likely donate it.

You can find other participants and fun quilts from this sew along by searching on the hashtag #scrappysummersal2020 on Instagram.

One of the life events that happened recently is a major (and expensive) surgery for our girl, Pepper. She had the surgery one week ago today, and she is doing pretty well with her recovery. We’re hoping that she’ll be back to hiking with us later this winter or next spring. She needs a full 8-10 weeks for recovery plus multiple physical therapy sessions.

If you’d like to help, I started a GoFundMe to offset some of the cost of the surgery and physical therapy.

Here’s a look at Pepper post-op with her poor, furless leg and incision:

Pepper, resting after knee surgery

Each day, she is getting stronger! We just have to keep this very active dog from running or jumping for 8 weeks. Whew!

Happy quilting!

Jen

Starting a Tula Nova Quilt + Wildfires

Hi everyone,

We are experiencing devastating wildfires here in Oregon, the worst fires seen in over 100 years. We’re in what is called level 1 evacuation, which means stay alert and be prepared. We do not have to evacuate at this time and most likely will not have to evacuate. However, many people just south of us are in the level 3, immediate “get out” zone so my thoughts and prayers are with them!

The fire makes the skies look apocalyptic. Here’s a look yesterday, when the east winds were still blowing:

Wildfires coloring the sky

This morning, the east winds stopped blowing so we have heavy, stagnate air, filled with particulates. It is very dangerous to be outdoors

Heavy smoke in the air

If you want to help the victims who lost everything in the fires, you can donate to the Red Cross.

In the meantime, I started on my first Tula Nova EPP (English Paper Pieced) project several weeks ago. This technique is entirely hand-pieced so it makes for a great project to do in the evenings while watching shows, to take traveling, or to do while my kiddo is in taekwondo class.

I’m using the Disco Kitty fabric from the Quilty Box as my center. I’m also using various colors of 50 weight Aurifil thread for the piecing.

I took this picture several weeks ago while we tent camped along the Oregon coast.

Tula Nova with a Disco Kitty center

When we got home, my quilt inspector decided to help out. He thoroughly approves of my theme for this quilt!

Romeo helps with my Tula Nova piecing

I’ve just finished adding the fourth round, and I went for a purple/pink Tent Stripe fabric by Tula Pink Don’t you love how the stripes add a secondary star around the solid lavender?

Tula Nova – adding stripes

The next round has 10 star points plus 10 diamond shapes to connect the stars. Each round will take longer and longer, but I am enjoying the process and it helps alleviate stress in these crazy times.

Have you made a Tula Nova quilt? I’d love to see it!

Happy quilting and stay safe!

Jen

Sorting My Scrap Bin for a Sew Along

Hi everyone,

I have a very large shoe box, the kind that fits boots, behind my sewing area where I toss scraps from projects that are large enough to reuse. These scraps have been growing and growing until my box was overflowing.

Then, I noticed that @thehomebodycompany and @the.weekendquilter were hosting an Instagram scrap busting sew along called the “Scrappy Summer Sew Along” with the hashtag, #scrappysummersal2020. This sew along uses a free pattern, which contains some different sizing options for using the simple 9-patch block for the quilt.

I dumped out my scraps and started sorting into color groups.

Sorting scraps

Wow, that got tiring fast in my very warm sewing room so I took a little break. When I came back into the room, I found my cat, Romeo, decided to reorganize things a bit.

Romeo reorganizes the scraps

I convinced Romeo to let me continue sorting by color. As the piles grew, I started thinking about how I wanted my scrappy quilt to look. I decided to do a limited color palette by using just pinks/reds and yellow scraps for a raspberry lemonade theme. My background will be a white-on-white fabric from my stash.

I’m making the rectangular throw size quilt so I needed to cut hundreds of 2″ squares from my scraps and hundreds of 2″ squares from my background fabric.

For the background fabric, I used the XL Stripology Ruler by Creative Grids to first cut the 2″ strips, and then sub-cut the strips into 2″ squares. This ruler is a lifesaver! I cut out all my pieces quickly and accurately without any hand fatigue. I highly recommend investing in one of these rulers.

Here’s a look at some of my pretty 2″ squares, just waiting patiently to be sewn into 9-patch blocks.

Pretty 2″ squares

I’m using this project as a leader/ender for other projects that I have underway. I’ll show you some of my 9-patch blocks using these squares soon!

Happy quilting,

Jen

 

GoFundMe for Pepper’s TPLO Surgery

Hi everyone,

Today’s post is a little departure from quilting. Our best girl and hiking buddy sustained a torn ligament while hiking, and she now needs a very expensive surgery to repair it called TPLO.

We’ve had 3 different vet opinions, and they all agree on the same surgery. It’s in the $3000 to $5000 range, depending on vet, any complications that might pop up, and pre-surgery work.

We have a GoFundMe set up if you like to contribute and get Pepper out hiking on the trails again! I have also been destashing quilting fabric on my Instagram account to raise funds (@nwquiltedcat).

Pepper at the beach

Thanks for all your support and words of encouragement! Pepper gives everyone a big doggie hug and kiss.

Best,

Jen

Sea Glass BOM, Month 7

Happy Friday, everyone!

We made it through another week, although they are starting to blur together. The warm August days are beautiful, and I do enjoy getting a little outside each day during breaks and lunch as I work from home. My little backyard vegetable garden is thriving, and we’ve enjoyed several salads from the bounty. School is starting soon for my teen, but it will so very different being online rather than in person.

I finished my month 7 blocks for the Sea Glass BOM, designed by Fig Tree. I’m really enjoying the soothing color palette of these blocks each month.

This block is called Sea Star.

Sea Star block, month 7 in the Sea Glass BOM

My blocks in the BOM are growing! I just need to go back to last month and complete the flying geese (likely for border units).

Sea Glass BOM, months 1 through 7

Pretty, pretty sea glass! These blocks just seem to sparkle.

Have a great weekend and happy quilting,

Jen

Hawaiian Style Sourdough Banana Bread

Hi everyone,

Today’s post is a little diversion from my regular quilting and sewing themed posts.

I made some banana bread using some sourdough starter that turned out delicious so I’m sharing the recipe with you. I’m calling it “Hawaiian style” because it reminds me of some banana bread that I purchased at a road side stand in Hawaii a few years ago.

I listed the nuts and shredded coconut as “to taste” because some people want a little less texture, and others (like me) prefer a little more texture and crunch.

Hawaiian style sourdough banana bread, just out of the oven!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup mashed ripe bananas
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup sourdough starter
  • 2 cups flour (I used Bob’s Red Mill Artisan flour but all-purpose works fine)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup chopped macadamia nuts to taste (you could substitute almonds or walnuts)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup shredded coconut to taste
  • sprinkle of cinnamon and white sugar for the top

Instructions

  1. Use spray oil on a bread loaf pan.
  2. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the mashed bananas, applesauce, eggs, vanilla, brown sugar, and sourdough starter.
  4. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.
  5. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, and stir until just combined.
  6. Fold in the nuts and shredded coconut.
  7. Pour the batter into the loaf pan, and lightly sprinkle some cinnamon and sugar on the top for a subtle crunch and flavor.
  8. Bake for about 60 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.
  9. Cool and enjoy!

Hawaiian style banana bread, cooling

Sliced Hawaiian style banana bread, so yummy!

I only made the one loaf this afternoon and, with a teenage son and husband, this loaf will disappear quickly!

Let me know if you make this recipe in the comments below.

Enjoy!

-Jen

Making a 3D style of face mask

Hi everyone,

Recently, my nephew asked me to make him some solid color face masks that he can use at college. He wanted washable ones so that he doesn’t have to keep buying disposable ones and to create less waste.

I decided to try the “3D” style of mask, which is slightly boxed to allow for easier breathing because the fabric sits just a little farther out from the nose and mouth.

I followed a pattern and YouTube video by Add Crafts. She has a downloadable pattern in a link in the comments. The video does not offer text instruction, only visual instruction so you may need to pause it a few times to see how she assembles the mask

I used the size large pattern for my test mask. It did sew together fairly quickly. However, I think this pattern runs small. The size large is ok for me, but I asked my teen son to try it and he said it is too small. There is an XL size that I will try next.

Here’s a look at the mask with the pattern:

3D Face Mask, size large, pattern by Add Crafts

The top of the pattern has a curved indentation to fit the nose area better, and you can insert a wire.

Here’s a look at the 3D mask outside and inside:

For me,  I prefer the feel of the rounded style of face mask using the Craft Passion pattern. It’s definitely all about personal preference! I’m going to make my nephew one of each style, and ask him which style he prefers to wear.

Happy quilting!

-Jen